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  • in reply to: The Pace- mental aspects of riding #26942
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    IBA270
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    It’s a classic and has been around for some time. Definately a must read for all of us whether you are a group rider or like to ride alone. One important thing to remember; if you’re every scaring yourself, you’re riding over your head. Slow down…

    in reply to: 1st Flat!! #26941
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    IBA270
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    Lot’s of good tires out there in that size…Bridgestones, Michelin Power Roads are nice…Your bike is relatively light and lacking gobs of HP so getting a tire that will last reasonably well should be no issue at all. I just spooned some BT-021’s onto my wife’s Duc and I like them pretty well. Basically, just find a tire with a price you like and go for it. Modern rubber is all pretty good and unless you’re doing serious time at the track, it’ll all work equally well for you.

    in reply to: What’s a reasonable dealer markup for tires? #26867
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    IBA270
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    I buy everything I can local…except tires. I even have a good friend who is in the business, and his COSTS are more than what I can get tires for. Beyond that, he says his liability for scuffing wheels is pretty high and pulling a guy off to change tires (rarely if ever is there a reservation made) makes it a money losing proposition. I mount/balance my own and have for years. $298 trackside for Pures is a steal…good for you! The rest is just a hastle…both to you AND your dealer…

    in reply to: Well,I passed my MSF road skills test. #26843
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    IBA270
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    Napoleon, ping me with where you lost points, if you can remember, and I can help you with a practice program. You are correct in your self assessment, and I’m glad that you have recognized it: you are not ready for the streets. The good news is, that you’re 100% qualified to now find a place where you can set up some drills and practice your skills so we can get you there. Motorcycling is an aquired skill, and you’re in the middle of aquiring it. Don’t get down over this: it’s normal.

    in reply to: Fischer Motorcycle #26800
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    IBA270
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    motors…let’s see what they do. You may or may not know that MUCH of the big four count on Korean production of parts…not all are entirely “made in Japan”. Brembo and Ohlins are MUCH more than $1K. Depending on the fork internals, the shock alone will cost you $1K. Brakes, retail, another grand…

    in reply to: Lee Parks Total Control #26786
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    IBA270
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    I understand Park’s class is really good, and it’s not surprising that you found it a challenge. Everyone does who hasn’t had any REAL advanced instruction. I’ve read Park’s book, and incorporate much of what he teaches in track schools, but also to explain a little to beginning student’s about the physics of what’s going on with the motorcycle and why they do what they do. Just a quick point; it’s Slow/Look/Press/Roll…not lean. You probably learned that you CAN have some impact by leaning, but your precise turning control comes from the press at the proper turn in point.

    Trail braking is certainly a more advanced technique and while it’s not (IMO) difficult to learn, it’s key that the rider is confident and smooth in the application of the brake and it is used to scrub speed for a proper entry into a turn and not neccesarily as a quick or panic stop technique. That’s where things start to go very wrong…

    Sounds like you had an awesome time! I’m jealous!

    in reply to: Beginning to ride, a thanks to all #26722
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    IBA270
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    I’ve owned Arai (s) Shoei (s) HJC, Nolan, Bieffe…surely there are more in there.

    eternal is right on the money; helmet technology is very, very good and most any helmet on the market will do a good job of protecting you. DO NOT sacrifice fit for price. Buy the helmet the fits you the best, and make sure that you understand what good fit is. There really is more to it than being “snug” and not being able to turn your head side to side in the helmet without it moving, or that you can’t pull it off while it’s on your head.

    IMO…and it’s the same mistake I made when I started riding…don’t buy your helmet online. Your chances of being dissappointed are very high. There is simply no way of knowing how well it will fit you until you try it on and wear it around the store for a while.

    It’s an expensive lesson to learn, and since I’m not the sharpest tool, it took me a few times…;-)

    in reply to: GS500 or SV650 for first beginner bike? #26631
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    IBA270
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    If you’re just starting out especially…why would you need full fairings? If it’s just for aesthetics, then I wouldn’t bother. Seriously. Besides, if you DO end up dropping it in your garage or on your side walk, your feelings are going to be very hurt.

    in reply to: GS500 or SV650 for first beginner bike? #26604
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    IBA270
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    to stay away from 600cc inline 4 Supersport. I’m glad you had a good experience and you’re enjoying your FZ. There’s thousands out there that do as well. But there are also thousands out there that crash them with little more than 6-10 miles on the odometer. For those of us who enjoy the track or racing, this is great news because it supplies us with an almost unlimited number of doner bikes for the track.

    I don’t think it’s neccesarily a case of “not being able to handle” the bike has much as it’s the rather odd nature of the power delivery and the incredible brakes of the modern supersports. Below 8-9K they are easy to ride, and almost no fun as there is little hp or torque. Get the tach swinging about that though, and all hell breaks loose in a double quick hurry. Right after that occurs, most beginners, being caught off guard and being unaccustomed to the powerful brakes (generally only requiring a single finger to brake on the street) apply far too much brake (often the rear) and down they go in an instant.

    There’s a reason why young riders and those with little experience find getting full coverage insurance very difficult and when/if they do, it’s VERY expensive.

    A 250 is plenty of bike!! They’ll go fast too, but they power curve is much more predictable and the brakes are matched to the performance and the intended use of the bike, which is the street.

    in reply to: where’s all the gear at? #26594
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    IBA270
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    I’m not knocking anyone that buys a helmet via the i-net…I understand not everyone has access to a good, knowledgable dealer…having said that…

    There are two things I wouldn’t get over the i-net; a bride or a helmet…You just don’t know how they’re going to work until they show up on your door step, it’s your life and they both are difficult to send back.

    in reply to: My 1st Bike and 1st Ride Report! #26544
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    IBA270
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    Because you’re not looking through the turn. Don’t look at the lines, rather a pick a reference point through the turn and ride to it. Your arc should then be smooth…

    Good looking bike! Sounds like you’re enjoying it!

    in reply to: Experiences from the Experienced Rider Course #26482
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    IBA270
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    Can’t disagree with that…it is better than nothing.

    in reply to: Experiences from the Experienced Rider Course #26451
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    IBA270
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    You can take the ERC to satisfy the riding portion? OMG….

    At any rate, the u-turn box on the ERC is ridiculously large. If those dudes can’t u-turn in the box, or the most generous off-set weave…watch out for them on the road. The can’t ride!!!

    Good on you for taking more training! You were running wide becaue you weren’t looking far enough or pressing hard enough…or both. No worries…something to practice on!

    in reply to: Started Searching…Could use some advice #26445
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    IBA270
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    Excellent choice! I really like the SV’s quite a lot. Whenver I’m in my friends shop in Dallas, and obviously new riders are looking at supersports, I like to show them the SV’s and talk about the advantages and the “liveability” of them over the inline 4’s. I think you’re really going to like it. I expect you’ll own it for a long time. When ever you think it’s time to move up, get a Penske, Works or Ohlins shock and Race Tech Gold Valves for the forks…it’ll be like getting a brand new bike!

    in reply to: Started Searching…Could use some advice #26410
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    IBA270
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    It’s got slightly less HP than an SV 650 with a slightly lower seat. Maintenance is minimal (more than an SV though) and there’s tons of aftermarket. The 696 starts to be a bit much bike however…I think they have north of 80 HP. While that’s not a screamer, that’s quite a bit more than the 60hp of the other bikes you’re looking at. PM with questions on Duc’s if you’d like…

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 175 total)