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Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 220 total)
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  • in reply to: Is this forum officially dead? #29375
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    bigguybbr
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    OK I think this has officially kicked the bucket. Well it’s been real, and it’s been fun guys! Ride safe!

    in reply to: Suzuki TU 250 review #29312
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    bigguybbr
    Participant

    It is a hot little bike. Unfortunatly for the big boned, the closest thing you can get new with similar look and ergo’s is a Triumph Bonneville.

    in reply to: New goodies (beware Dial-Up – Long Post with Pics) #29308
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    bigguybbr
    Participant

    I’ve been looking at that tank bag, and am curious as to how it works out for you. I’ve been looking at getting a tank bag before doing a motorcycle camping trip this summer.

    You’ll have to let me know, maybe make a quick review of it :-)

    in reply to: New goodies (beware Dial-Up – Long Post with Pics) #29306
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    bigguybbr
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    Sweet. I might have to pick up a pair.

    I’m trying to talk the boss into a pair of mesh over pants. She wines that it’s too hot in the summer and won’t get on the bike because she doesn’t want to change out of her shorts. I’m looking to see if i can find her a pair of pants she can throw on over shorts and get out and ride!!!!

    in reply to: Hello Every1 #29305
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    bigguybbr
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    If you are riding a sport bike, be sure to use your legs to help keep your body posture. Leaning to heavily on your wrists is going to cause discomfort. Also being new to riding, you do develop a bit more muscles to help stabilize yourself. Try and think of any other time in your normal life that you are holding into a bar for hours at a time. Make sure when you just start out to try and keep your rides shorter. Don’t try and get the iron butt award right when you first start!

    Looking now at your profile pic I’m assuming you actually ride a cruiser (I’m guessing maybe a Honda Magna 500 or maybe a Suzuki Boulevard s40??? Too small of a pic to tell). So the sport bike advice isn’t going to help you, but maybe someone else will find it useful. So my best guess is that it is a combo of 2 factors. One, you unconsciously have a death grip on the throttle and are holding your wrist tightly in a bent position. Secondly, the vibration is numbing your hand and helping to make it more sore. You want to be loose enough while riding to be able to swing your elbows like you were doing the funky chicken at any time. When you are new to riding it happens all the time that you are holding on way too tight from nerves. For a while you will have to consciously remind yourself to loosen up. Slowly but surely it’ll get more comfortable.

    in reply to: New goodies (beware Dial-Up – Long Post with Pics) #29302
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    bigguybbr
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    I noticed the picture of the integrated tail light has a Mass plate on it. One thing you have to be careful of are the specific signal marker laws in your state. I know as a matter of fact that Mass requires your markers to be at least 12″ apart, which rules out going to just an integrated tail light. I had a buddy that ended up having to get some stalks to put on his fender eliminator after striping down to just the integrated tail light. Also with LED’s you sometimes have to replace out the blinker relay, or the lights will blink too fast when signaling, and you can get a ticket.

    My only issue with going to just an integrated tail light without any additional signals is that it does make your bike harder to see, and for some drivers (like the crazy ones that don’t wear glasses while driving), it makes it harder to to determine what direction you are signaling. I do want an integrated tail light, but in addition to my signals, just to draw more attention to myself.

    BTW, I am super jealous of your SV650. Wish I had one. Post some pics if you got em.

    in reply to: New goodies (beware Dial-Up – Long Post with Pics) #29301
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    bigguybbr
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    Isn’t the RF-200 over a decade old????? Keep it on a shelf if you like it but by no means should you be wearing that for protection! It’s way past it’s usable lifespan.

    Most manufacturers recommend replacing your helmet every two to four years, so that is still $150 to $300 a year for your (incredibly sweet) helmet…

    But you are 100% right, your noggin is the most important thing you have to protect, I just saying I don’t have $600 to spend on a helmet every 2-4 years.

    Here’s a good read for anyone about helmets

    http://www.msf-usa.org/downloads/helmet_CSi.pdf

    in reply to: New goodies (beware Dial-Up – Long Post with Pics) #29295
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    bigguybbr
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    At $600 though, sounds like it probably lightened your wallet by at least 1200 grams :-P

    in reply to: New goodies (beware Dial-Up – Long Post with Pics) #29294
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    bigguybbr
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    in reply to: About Steve McQueen, actor and motorcycle racer #29297
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    bigguybbr
    Participant

    You DID NOT forget The Great Escape!!!!

    I read your entire post with intrigue and did not miss a word…

    yeah that…

    Yup, he was good on a bike. Auto racing wise, he was no Paul Newman…

    in reply to: About Steve McQueen, actor and motorcycle racer #29291
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    bigguybbr
    Participant

    wups…

    wasn’t reading, was more skimming there , time to edit…

    in reply to: New goodies (beware Dial-Up – Long Post with Pics) #29287
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    bigguybbr
    Participant

    Arai and Shoei make some awesome helmets, just unfortunately out of my price range for the time being. Maybe someday…

    in reply to: My new Karizma ZMR…. #29286
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    bigguybbr
    Participant

    This is a super hot forum debate topic for a lot of car and bike forums…

    From what I subscribe to, the coefficient of friction doesn’t really apply to tires in any useful way as it is too simple, only modeling sliding friction and not rolling friction or the effect of deformation(such as while turning). Grip is a function of the mechanical (not just tread pattern, think tire pressure) and thermal properties of the tire along with the riding surface, the weight of the motorcycle, rider, and gear. While the size of the contact patch does not form a direct linear correlation with grip, a bigger contact patch influences the magnitude of the coefficient of friction due to temperature and abrasive effects.

    So theoretically it is possible for the narrow tire to have equal grip, but practically, not so much.

    Now the real question is, why do we call them tires while the rest of the world calls them tyres??? Where’s the theory on that one!?!? :-)

    in reply to: My new Karizma ZMR…. #29283
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    bigguybbr
    Participant

    …But also less of a contact patch when at speed in inclement conditions, and while cornering. It would be my guess that this is designed to be something like an urban commuter bike, but with full plastics?

    in reply to: My new 2007 Ninja #29280
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    bigguybbr
    Participant

    I think he was talking more about riding position than anything.

    Although in terms of handling, a sport bike is just that, sportier than a bike built for cruising. They are built to have better cornering clearance.

    He’s also moving from a vulcan 500, which is a fine bike, to a ninja 650r, which is a much more capable machine.

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 220 total)