Great Articles

http://forums.sportrider.com/70/591801/new-riders/new-riders-please-read...

That one talks about why to start on a smaller bike and pretty much backs up everything on this site.

http://www.pashnit.com/forum/showthread.php?t=1145

That one is a write up on the ex250 by a Hayabusa rider.

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Both were really great articles, although I was disappointed to see cruisers not discussed much in the first one :( (I'm still trying to justify to myself my recent bike purchase :P)

--"You don't get to be old bein' no foo, see? Lotta young wise men that's deaaad as a motha!#@% ain't they?-- Richard Pryor as "Mudbone"

--"You don't get to be old bein' no foo, see? Lotta young wise men that's deaaad as a motha!#@% ain't they?-- Richard Pryor as "Mudbone"

That sports rider article is one of the best articles I've read about the noobs who only ask because they want validation. A lot of great arguments against the common reasons for going with a 600+cc super sport replica...

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If there's anything more important than my ego
around, I want it caught and shot now...

--- AFM #998 If there's anything more important than my ego around, I want it caught and shot now...

I read that article and I have read and posted on this board. I have seen all the 600cc is to much stuff. I have never even ridden anything with a clutch much less something with 2 wheels and a clutch and I still bought a brand new 08 Kawasaki Ninja 650 lime green. I had to buy a new bike to finance it. It was the only way i could get a bike this summer. I was between the 500 and the 650 but I just couldn't see not paying the extra 1,000 for the 500.

I guess you can put me in with those people that think there responsible enough to handle it. I have owned the bike for a week and not left my driveway (I have a long driveway) yet just practicing starting and stopping. I bought the Idiot's Guide like that article suggested and read through it and also took the MSF safety class. Also I have the proper gear to ride and even use it in my driveway. I'm not gonna try to say I am right and you are wrong because i don't believe there is a right or wrong in this situation. I honestly believe its different person to person. Would I suggest a 650 to most new riders? I dunno I don't know enough about riding to have a suggestion, but I wouldn't say don't get what you want unless it was just something obviously stupid.

I guess I don't have much of an opinion since i can get to about 20 in 2nd gear in my driveway, but from what I can tell i see nothing wrong with the 650 as a first bike. I am 6'1, 190 and feel comfortable on it. I dunno not trying to start a flame war or anything just wanted to state my opinion.

Actually, the 650r you picked up is along the same class as the SV650. You got lucky in your choice. You got a p-twin engine without the major throttle goosing that you'd get from a 600cc inline 4. You probably didn't make the best choice given your experience, but you didn't make the worst choice either. That article could use some updating with the newer middleweight p/v/l-twin bikes out on the market. But there's more than just raw cc to look at. The article is basically railing against the 600cc inline4 super sport replica class of bikes... like the cbr600rr. ;-)

Ride safe and keep the rubber side down. :-)

---
If there's anything more important than my ego
around, I want it caught and shot now...

--- AFM #998 If there's anything more important than my ego around, I want it caught and shot now...

No offence intended, but starting and stopping in your drive for one week, while commendable as a learning exercise, hardly qualifies you to proclaim that a 650 is a good beginners bike or that you should just pick whatever you like as a first bike.

I say reserve your judgement until you've ridden it in traffic and in the twisties for a while (or have fallen off of it).

Yes, it does vary from person to person and you could learn to ride on a Hyabusa or a Rocket III I dare say, but it'd be a heck of a lot more difficult (and dangerous) than on a smaller and lighter bike.

GET sliders for your new 650...

Most new riders drop their bikes. I got a 650 for my first bike and I dropped it (I hit a hole while turning/trying to park)... lucky it was used and the previous owner already scratched it, so it wasn't that big of deal for me- I was going to replace the fairings anyways.... but when I do I will be getting sliders so it won't ever happen again.

btw... I think the 650 is an excellent first bike... but it is definitely more comparable to an SV650 than the ninja 250 in terms of being good as an entry level bike.

The thing I like about it is that the power delivery is very forgiving. you CAN get into trouble once you get into the higher RPMs... the 650 seems to have more mid-range torque; but for the most part the throttle is smooth and very forgiving especially in the lower RPMs.

If you hadn't had a 650 as your first bike, and instead, had a smaller, lighter bike, you might not have dropped it...

I don't think so...there is a 60lbs weight difference between a Ninja 250 and 650...

60lbs... that's like a backstreet boy...

besides... people drop small bikes too... they were dropping them left in right at the MSF course... hell I was counting on dropping my bike-- that's why I got it used. Even my Dad dropped his first bike twice in one week... it was only 125cc.

I'm not saying big bikes are the same as smaller bikes when It comes to learning... but I think your point is negligible cause the 250 and 650 weights are rather close. In the given situation I would have dropped the bike regardless if it was 125cc or 1000.... the Front wheel started to roll down an indentation on the ground and I reacted and jammed on the front brake while the handlebars were turned...

Now, the difference between a 250cc and a 1100cc crusier is definitely dramatic... once one of those bikes get enough lean while standing still, its next to impossible to keep it up without hurting yourself. Something like that I would agree with you on.